Asking the Right Questions…Off to the Future We Go!

kurt

These five questions have been on a sticky note on my desktop for the last 6 years. I look at them every day. They are about the dream and not about the fear.

“The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.” —Albert Einstein

Dreams create energy. Fear destroys. We see this in business, at home, at school, and in every aspect of our lives. I’ve noticed a pattern of this throughout my own life and in the observations of the world around me.  I didn’t know how to articulate it until I heard of the book Breaking the Rules by Kurt Wright.

Kurt explains that most of the time, especially in business, we are focused on fixing a problem. And we have endless meetings about what is going wrong, which is the opposite of what we should be doing. To energize a team and create a system of effortless high performance we must start by asking the right questions.  High performance also comes with believing that it is possible…dreaming.

If you read my post on Editing Epiphanies, you know I love questions. They changed my life. So when Kurt armed me with another set of questions, I was so excited!

I started working at my current job about six years ago. My hire was nothing short of miraculous. I am grateful every day I step in the office. It was a hire that I attribute to me walking into the interview believing–really believing–I had value. Believing you have value after some devastating failures isn’t that easy to do, but I mustered that up thanks to another book  and one really good sermon (future post). My attitude was convincing enough for them to hire me, but it was only convincing because I truly believed it. I wasn’t pretending. I focused on what was right with me, not what was wrong. I focused on my strengths and experiences, which had value, whether the world and I had once perceived those experiences as failures. I walked in figuring I had nothing to lose.

When I was hired, it cleared my mind and my perspective. If that attitude got me hired, where could that attitude take me in the company? I wasn’t looking back.  I armed myself with my natural way of being — a dreamer. Fear didn’t have to drive me. If this company was willing to give me a chance, I wasn’t going to play it safe. They wanted my best. They wanted the person they interviewed–the person with strength and value. And my best has always come from dreaming big.

Thanks to Kurt Wright I was also armed with a new way of asking questions. Every situation and project I was presented with gave me an opportunity to ask these questions. And miraculous things happened. As a project manager, these questions are the only way to go. They get teams thinking about what could be, not what we are fixing.  Anything is possible. And these questions work anywhere. They work at church, at home…even on the international space station, if you were there.

The Right Questions

What’s right?

What makes it right?

What would be ideally right?

What’s not quite right yet?

What resources can I find to make it right?

When we start talking about what is right, it builds creative energy that allows the dreaming to begin. Try it. You won’t be disappointed. Take the risks. Know that  analyzing, dissecting, and theorizing , though sometimes necessary, can become an enemy of doing phenomenal things.

I think this is why I hate performance review time, but love the goal setting time of year. I am not interested in analyzing the past. I am interested in designing the future. So won’t you come with me? The future is waiting….let’s go!

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